Tag Archives: sales techniques

Getting the sales call started

In Yellow Pages sales, it’s a super critical moment.  You’ve finally scored that face-to-face meeting with the decision maker at a potential new advertiser.  You’ve done your prep work and you’re ready to rock and roll.  But you are not really sure (comfortable) with how to best get the ball rolling, to get past the first few awkward moments of small talk and start building a business relationship.  You can feel that knot building in your stomach.

Some people can start up conversations with complete strangers with total ease.  It almost seems natural to them.  You’ve seen them at business meetings, cocktail hours, greeting new coworkers at lunch, or even with new customers.  They seem to have the gift of getting the conversation going seamlessly.

If you find yourself struggling to get these sales meetings rolling, here are eight possible tips to consider:

1. Take a deep breath:  As you start this process don’t lose sight of your overall objective – you just want to establish a repore with this person, one that can make the business part of the conversation flow much easier.  From the advertisers prospective, when was the last time anyone wanted to spend 15 minutes or more just hearing about them and their buisness??  Most likely that hasn’t even happened with their spouse.  You also want to get yourself comfortable and settled so you can do your job – identifying needs that this business has.  If you let them speak 80% of the time, then you will be considered as a courteous, trust worthy person. Given that most small business owners are busy people (or at least want to be perceived that way), they will make it very clear when they are ready to switch from chit-chat to business.

2.  Reframe the purpose of your visit (in your own mind):  and this may to go against all of your training — don’t make sales calls – make a service call.  If you take a step back, aren’t you really in the business of helping others be more successful in their businesses? When you call on a potential customer, is it any different from helping a neighbor with a project, visiting a friend in the hospital, or reaching out to help a family member struggling with a serious personal problem??  Net net isn’t it an opportunity to be of service?

3. Start by making the first move – Simply put, you take the initiativeExperts say it takes only three seconds to make a first impression.  That doesn’t leave you much time.  Get that hand out, put your best smile on, and start the greeting. When you make the first move, you create some energy and project yourself in a confident manner. It takes a little practice if you are uncomfortable doing it, and we’re not suggesting you over do this – you don’t want to be diving across the desk to tackle them.  With a little practice you will start the conversation stronger and it makes the early small talk a lot easier.

4. Find common ground fast… “Common ground” are those life intersection points we seek with people we meet for the first time. This is how we connect with people we do not know.  Current weather is an overly simplistic one and not a very unique one.  Topics could range from geography, education, hobbies, kids, colleges, sport teams or many others which can make up the general opening topics of conversation. My suggestion is you be quickly looking around in that decision makers office – what pictures do they have out, do they have their college football teams schedule up, an award they have received, something to help you get started.  The general rule of thumb is to then take no more than two good shots (three at most) at finding common ground in a conversation with someone. If you have nothing in common, ok, don’t feel bad about it. They know it too. Most likely they will want to just get down to business at that point.

5. Use Their Favorite Word — their name.  Studies show that a person’s favorite word is their own name (hey, it’s all about me). As soon as the prospect tells you his or her name, write it down and then use it at least three times during the call.

6. Have some core go-to questions ready – News flash:  people like to talk about themselves and especially their buisnesses. Questions are the way to activate that desire, but to truly create actual interest you will need a couple of interesting questions. Be clear that you are not looking for an opening to launch into a long sales monologue about yourself or your business (yet). You are trying to take a sincere interest in the other person. I encourage you to develop questions in these categories:

— Future predictions:  If they are sports fans, ask the person what they believe will happen in the next year for their favorite team.  2012 was a big year for politics, but I wouldn’t suggest you go there as there is at least a 50/50 chance they are on the other side of spectrum from you.  The point is to create dialogue, and speculation about the future can do just that.

— What’s changed: Ask the person what changes have occurred in the particular area of family, sports, business or some other topic over the past year. This creates a conversation rather than an interrogation with monosyllabic answers.  For example, kids grow quickly – that picture from the kids soccer game is probably a couple of years old.  Are they still playing?

— If you get pushed to business immediately, how did you find/meet your prospect? Did someone refer them?  Did you find out about them through a cold call or a network meeting? This is not an insignificant phase, so do not take it for granted. For example, if someone has referred the prospect to you, the prospect is more likely to have faith in you than if the prospect had never heard of you before.

7. Silence is ok – I’m sure you have a friend like my buddy Amy (not her real name) who feels the need to fill every silence of longer than 2-3 seconds. This gets her trapped into conversations that she would like to exit, but has to re-engage in to avoid awkward moments. Let the silence hang for a moment.

8. Chat for how long?  This is the toughest one to gauge.  I’ve seen people that want to get right to business and others that will want to chat for an hour.  The point is — be patient.  At some point they will turn to you and say “…what do you have?” That’s the cue to open up your binder/case/whatever and start the formal part of the sales conversation.

Good luck and good selling……

Getting the sales call started

In Yellow Pages sales, it’s a super critical moment.  You’ve finally scored that face-to-face meeting with the decision maker at a potential new advertiser.  You’ve done your prep work and you’re ready to rock and roll.  But you are not really sure (comfortable) with how to best get the ball rolling, to get past the first few awkward moments of small talk and start building a business relationship.  You can feel that knot building in your stomach.

Some people can start up conversations with complete strangers with total ease.  It almost seems natural to them.  You’ve seen them at business meetings, cocktail hours, new coworkers at lunch, or even with new customers.  They seem to have the gift of getting the conversation going seamlessly.  If you find yourself struggling to get these sales meetings rolling, here are a few tips to consider:

1. Take a deep breath:  As you start this process don’t lose sight of your overall objective – you just want to establish a repore with this person, one that can make the business part of the conversation flow much easier.  From the advertisers prospective, when was the last time anyone wanted to spend 15 minutes or more just hearing about them??  Most likely that hasn’t even happened with their spouse.  You also want to get yourself comfortable and settled so you can do your job – identifying needs that this business has.  If you let them speak 80% of the time, then you will be considered as a courteous, trust worthy person. Given that most small business owners are busy people (or at least want to be perceived that way), they will make it very clear when they are ready to switch from chit-chat to business.

2. Start by making the first move – Simply put, you take the initiativeGet that hand out, put your best smile on, and start the greeting. When you make the first move, you create some energy and project yourself in a confident manner. It takes a little practice if you are uncomfortable doing it, and we’re not suggesting you over do this – you don’t want to be diving across the desk to tackle them.  With a little practice you will start the conversation stronger and it makes the early small talk a lot easier.

3. Find common ground fast… “Common ground” are those life intersection points we seek with people we meet for the first time. This is how we connect with people we do not know.  Current weather is an overly simplistic one and not very unique one.  It could be geography, education, hobbies, kids, colleges, sport teams or many others which can make up the general opening topics of conversation. My suggestion is you be quickly looking around in that decision makers office – what pictures do they have out, do they have their college football teams schedule up, an award they have received, something to help you get started.  The general rule of thumb is to then take no more than two good shots (three at most) at finding common ground in a conversation with someone. If you have nothing in common, ok, don’t feel bad about it. They know it too. Most likely they will want to just get down to business at that point.

4. Have some go-to questions ready – News flash:  people like to talk about themselves. Questions are the way to activate that desire, but to truly create actual interest you will need a couple of interesting questions. Be clear that you are not looking for an opening to launch into a long monologue about yourself or your business (yet). You are trying to take a sincere interest in the other person. I encourage you to develop questions in these categories:

— Future predictions:  If they are sports fans, ask the person what they believe will happen in the next year for their favorite team.  2012 is going to be a big year for politics, but I wouldn’t suggest you go there as there is at least a 50/50 chance they are on the other side of spectrum.  The point is to create dialogue, and speculation about the future does just that.

— What’s changed: Ask the person what changes have occurred in the particular area of family, sports, business or some other topic over the past year. This creates a conversation rather than an interrogation with monosyllabic answers.  For example, kids grow quickly – that picture from the kids soccer game is probably a couple of years old.  Are they still playing?

5. Silence is ok – I’m sure you have a friend like my buddy Amy who feels the need to fill every silence of longer than 2-3 seconds. This gets her trapped into conversations that she would like to exit, but has to re-engage in to avoid awkward moments. Let the silence hang for a moment.  

6. For how long?  This is the toughest one to gauge.  I’ve seen people that want to get right to business and others that will want to chat for an hour.  The point is — be patient.  At some point they will turn to you and say “…what do you have?” That’s the cue to open up your binder/case/whatever and start the formal part of the conversation. 

 

Good luck and good selling……

You really can hear a lot just by listening

If you ask sales managers what one of the most common mistakes they see even the best of sales reps make from time to time, it is simply:  talking too much.  Other research has shown that when a customer isn’t happy with a salesperson, it is usually symptomatic of a rep that didn’t probe enough to understand the businesses true needs, or actually listen to what the customer was telling them.  Instead, the rep usually tries to short cut things and launch a full frontal selling siege on the customer.  Of course, this isn’t a good selling practice.  But during a time when most reps are being pressed for better results and higher sales productivity, are you surprised? 

Some people are natural listeners, while others are chomping at the bit to speak, continuously!!  Here are some suggestions on how to improve your focus on what the customer has to say.

  1. Get ready to listen. Before your meeting starts, check all those personal issues at the front door.  You need to be attentive and concentrate on hearing what the customer has to say.
  2. Start with a set of good probing questions. The probing phase it really pretty basic (in concept) — ask good questions, then wait for the answer.  This is not just being polite; it also shows that you respect your question enough to wait to hear a real answer. The best indicators that you hear and understand someone come from your questions and how you ask them.
  3. Replay back what you hear. For example: “Tom, thank you for sharing that with me, what your telling me is that X, Y, and Z are very important to you, correct?” This technique makes sure that you are tuned in and listening. It also confirms what you thought you heard. 
  4. Show some empathy. There is no question that this bad economy has had an impact of all businesses, especially small business.  When you hear the difficulties, issues, and challenges they face, acknowledge how difficult it must be for them. If you respond to human issues, people may be ready to develop a relationship with you when it comes time to focus on the business items.
  5. Seize opportunities to inject some humor. In the course of natural conversation, a little humor enhances what may otherwise be an overly serious, perhaps even negative situation. We’re not talking about sarcasm, but more a lighter moment between two people.  No, you’re not expected to be a stand-up comic.  But seize the moment when a humorous comment helps the conversation along. 
  6. Note the non-verbal communication clues: These can range for facial expressions, tone of voice, body gestures, and more. Repetition of certain words can also be a sign to consider. These can all be telling symptoms for what the customer is thinking.
  7. Know the value of silence. A brief period of silence is ok, and will generally cause whomever speaks next to produce a more quality, in-depth response.  It also allows both of you to regroup and process on what’s just been said, to ask additional questions, seek further clarification, or provide even more information.

Take the time to care.  Take the time to listen.  Take the time to complete the sale.